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26 suspension bridges were found for search criteria: BOB . All 26 bridges from the search results appear below. Wherever you see a "Bridgemeister ID" number you can click it to isolate the bridge on its own page. If you don't see what you were looking for, try an image search with the same criteria: BOB. This will find the bridge if it is pictured on the site, but is not a catenary suspension bridge.
1801 (chain bridge)
Iron Bridge, Pennsylvania, USA (Jacob's Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:3
Structurae ID:0000873
O'Donnell ID:0
References:AAJ, ASB, BBR, BOB, BPL, CAB, DSE20000116, HBE, LAB, PTS2
Principals:Judge James Finley
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:70f
Deck width:12.5f
Notes
  • In an email dated January 16, 2000, Don Sayenga provided information about the location of this bridge. Generally attributed to Uniontown (the seat of Fayette County, PA), Mr. Sayenga offers some clues about the bridge's true location. "[James Finley] stated that he built it near the home of his friend Meason which implies a connection for the iron as Meason was making iron. Meason's home has survived by the way, a beautiful place. Finley stated it was a combination contract with the cost split between two counties, and he stated it was built over Jacob's Creek which is the county boundary. He also makes it clear it was on the road to Greensburg. The only place the old road crossed Jacob's Creek is just south of Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. On the geodetic survey maps this spot is marked "Iron Bridge" but there is no town there. The last time I was there I saw a sign that said "Iron Bridge" on an automobile scrap yard. I found absolutely no trace of the bridge, but it was not very big, so there was no need for a huge abutment."
  • First suspension bridge with a rigid level deck.
1816 Spider
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuylkill River)
Bridgemeister ID:20
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, GHD, HBE, LAB, PTS2
Principals:Josiah White, Erskine Hazard
Use:Footbridge
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:393.75f
Notes
  • Narrow footbridge. First wire bridge in North America. HBE notes "first wire suspension bridge in any country."
  • Often described as having collapsed under the weight of ice and snow, Don Sayenga notes that no contemporary sources confirm this demise. Since the nearby chain bridge did fail under weight of ice and snow, he believes this fate has been misattributed to the White and Hazard footbridge. Don believes the bridge was just dismantled at some point after June, 1816.
  • Al Zagofsky also wrote to explain there was no evidence of this bridge collapsing under weight of ice and snow. Al writes: "According to an original source Captain Joshua Rowley Watson, who inspected the bridge on June 15, 1816: '...There was a bridge, but which by the weight of ice and snow, has been carried away.' This refers to the previous bridge that the cable bridge was temporarily replacing. I did not see any cause for failure of the wire rope bridge. My guess is that it was removed when the regular bridge was repaired. The same article shows a sketch that he made, showing the main span to be 407 feet. I am looking at the Canal History and Technology Proceedings Vol 5, March 22, 1986."
1820 Union
Horncliffe, Berwick-upon-Tweed vicinity, England and Fishwick, Scotland, United Kingdom (River Tweed)
Bridgemeister ID:373
Structurae ID:0000162
Coordinates:N 55.75256 W 2.10677
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BBR, BC3, BEM, BOB, HBE, MOS, NTB, PTS2, SBR
Principals:Sir Samuel Brown
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:In use (last checked, 2009)
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:449f
Deck width:18f
Notes
Newspaper article, collection of David Denenberg Photo by Dave Cooper
1823 Brighton Pier
Brighton, East Sussex, England, United Kingdom
Bridgemeister ID:376
Structurae ID:0008326
References:AAJ, BEM, BOB, HBE, MOS, SBR
Principals:Sir Samuel Brown
Use:Footbridge
Status:Destroyed, 1896
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:4
Main spans:4 x 255f
Notes
  • SBR: Severely damaged 1833, 1836. Destroyed by storm 1896.
Print, collection of David Denenberg Print, collection of David Denenberg
1826 Broughton (Gerald Road)
Lancashire, England, United Kingdom (River Irwell)
Bridgemeister ID:379
References:AAJ, BOB, HBE, MOS, SBR
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced, 1914
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Main span:145.5f
Deck width:18.25f
Notes
  • Famously collapsed under weight of marching troops April 12, 1831. Was rebuilt and strengthened and eventually replaced in 1914.
1829 Montrose
Montrose, Scotland, United Kingdom (South Esk River)
Bridgemeister ID:388
References:AAJ, BEM, BOB, HBE, PTS2, SBR
Principals:Sir Samuel Brown
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced, 1931
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • SBR: March 19, 1830, with a "crowd of people, estimated at 700, ... watching a boat race," a chain broke "plunging most of the people into the river." Repaired. Wrecked by storm 1838. Repaired.
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg Print, collection of David Denenberg
1842 Fairmount (Callowhill St.)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuylkill River)
Bridgemeister ID:24
References:BBR, BOB, BPL, HBE, LAB, PTS2, WHSB
Principals:Charles Ellet
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced, 1875
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:342f
Notes
  • BBR and BOB say 1841.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1843 (suspension bridge)
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (Miami Canal)
Bridgemeister ID:25
References:BOB
Status:Removed
Suspended spans:3
1845 Pittsburgh Aqueduct
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Allegheny River)
Bridgemeister ID:27
Structurae ID:0006118
References:BOB, BOP, BPL, HBE, ONF, PTS2, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed, 1861
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:7
Main spans:7 x 162f
Notes
  • In use until 1860.
1846 Monongahela (Smithfield Street)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Monongahela River)
Bridgemeister ID:28
Structurae ID:0007338
References:BOB, BOP, BPL, HBE, ONF, PBR, PTS2
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed, 1882
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:8
Main spans:8 x 188f
Deck width:20f
1848 Delaware Aqueduct (Roebling Aqueduct)
Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania and Minisink Ford, New York, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:30
Structurae ID:0000260
O'Donnell ID:21
Coordinates:N 41.48262 W 74.98461
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BDR, BOB, BPL, GBD, LAB, LACE, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct and Vehicular (one-lane, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2006)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:4
Main spans:3 x 131f, 142f
Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Andy Warren Photo courtesy National Park Service Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell
1848 Niagara Suspension
Niagara Falls, New York, USA and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:29
References:BOB, BPL, HBE, ONF, PTS2
Principals:Charles Ellet
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:770f
Deck width:7.5f

Notes
1849 Lackawaxen Aqueduct
Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, USA (Lackawaxen River)
Bridgemeister ID:31
Structurae ID:0007339
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2 x 114.37f
Notes
1849 Wheeling (Wheeling and Belmont)
Wheeling, West Virginia, USA (Ohio River)
Bridgemeister ID:32
Structurae ID:0000478
O'Donnell ID:382
Coordinates:N 40.07167 W 80.72667
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BBR, BC3, BOB, BPL, CEJ, COB, GBD, HBE, LAB, LACE, ONF, PTS2, RWS, WCC, WHSB
Principals:Charles Ellet
Use:Vehicular (two-lane light)
Status:In use (last checked, 2011)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:1,010f
Notes
  • Rebuilt, 1854 after it was wrecked by a windstorm. Contrary to popular myth, the rebuilding was undertaken by Ellet and his assistant William K. McComas, not by John A. Roebling.
  • Overhauled, 1860. Again, popular myth often attributes this work to the Roeblings. WHSB attributes this work to William K. McComas. After this overhaul, the bridge still does not have the distinctive diagonal cable stays that give it the appearance of a Roebling bridge.
  • Overhauled, 1872, according to a design by Washington Roebling. John A. Roebling had died in 1869 and was not involved with this work. WHSB notes, "The design essentially Roeblingized the bridge with the diagonal cable stays that are such a prominent feature of the bridge."
  • Was still part of Virginia at time of completion.
  • Became longest suspension bridge by eclipsing 1834 Zaehringen - Fribourg, Switzerland.
  • Eclipsed by new longest suspension bridge 1851 Lewiston-Queenston - Lewiston, New York, USA and Queenston, Ontario, Canada.
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Wayne Grodkiewicz Photo by Stuart Brorson Photo by Scott Bumgardner Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photo by David Denenberg Collection of Doug Lehman
1851 High Falls Aqueduct
High Falls, New York, USA (Roundout Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:34
Structurae ID:0007341
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed, August, 1921
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:145f
Notes
1851 Lewiston-Queenston
Lewiston, New York, USA and Queenston, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:35
Structurae ID:0007333
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, HBE, PTS2
Principals:Edward Serrell
Use:Vehicular
Status:Wrecked, 1864
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:1,043f
Deck width:21f (AAJ: 19.5f)
Notes
  • Wrecked by wind February 1, 1864. Stay cables beneath the bridge had been disconnected to avoid damage from rising ice. Portions of the cables and deck remained, in a derelict state, as late as 1895. Replacement was not started until the late 1890's.
  • The February 3, 1864 edition of Niagara Falls Gazette describes the wind event: "Partial Destruction Of The Lewiston Suspension Bridge -- A portion of the flooring and other wood-work of the Lewiston Suspension Bridge was blown down during the gale Monday forenoon. It seems that the long guys had been cut during the late ice jam to prevent injury to the structure and thus its strength to withstand a gale was much weakened. The wind swept through the gorge on Monday with terrific force and swayed the bridge so that some of the cross timbers, near the centre were loosened from their fastenings, and fell, of course carrying the floor with them. A large portion at each end, remains without material injury. The extent of the damage -- financially -- we have not yet learned, but we judge from what we hear that it may be about $10,000. The bridge was built in 1852 and cost not far from $40,000. It will doubtless soon be repaired and in use."
  • Became longest suspension bridge by eclipsing 1849 Wheeling (Wheeling and Belmont) - Wheeling, West Virginia, USA. However, Don Sayenga notes the length of the suspended span of this bridge was only 849 feet, not 1,043 as often cited. Don writes: "[1,043 feet] was the distance between the towers built high up on the cliffs above the crossing - because there was no space for them below. The roadway suspended from the towers was only 849 feet span over the water from abutment to abutment." Thus, Roebling's Cincinnati bridge should be considered the first to eclipse Wheeling's record main span.
  • Eclipsed by new longest suspension bridge 1867 John A. Roebling (Cincinnati, Cincinnati and Covington) - Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky, USA.
  • Later at same location 1899 Lewiston-Queenston - Lewiston, New York, USA and Queenston, Ontario, Canada.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1851 Neversink Aqueduct
Cuddebackville, New York, USA (Neversink River)
Bridgemeister ID:36
Structurae ID:0007334
References:AAJ, BOB, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:170f
Notes
1854 Licking River I
Covington and Newport, Kentucky, USA (Licking River)
Bridgemeister ID:47
References:BOB, BPL, EOV
Principals:John Gray, George C. Tarvin
Status:Collapsed, 1854
Notes
  • BPL: Collapsed under weight of cattle 1853. BOB: Indicates year of completion and collapse as 1854. EOV: Appears more authoritative on the matter, "Although the bridge was not quite finished, Tarvin and the mayor of Covington rode the first vehicle across it on December 28, 1853. Less than two weeks later... the bridge collapsed."
  • The January 18, 1854 edition of The New York Times has a small article with a January 16, 1854 byline reporting the collapse of the bridge: "The... bridge... gave way this evening, while two men and eighteen cattle were crossing it... The keys which held the wire cable to the anchors gave way."
  • Replaced by 1854 Licking River II - Covington and Newport, Kentucky, USA.
1855 Niagara Suspension
Niagara Falls, New York, USA and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:51
Structurae ID:0000047
References:AAJ, BAAW, BBR, BFL, BMA, BOB, BPL, HBE, LIR, NSB, ONF, PTS2, SA18810716, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Rail and Vehicular (double-deck, heavy rail, with walkway)
Status:Replaced, 1897
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:821.3f
Notes
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1860 Allegheny River (Sixth Street)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Allegheny River)
Bridgemeister ID:59
Structurae ID:0007343
References:BOB, BOP, BPL, HBE, PBR, PTS2, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular (with walkway)
Status:Replaced, 1892
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:4
Main spans:2 x 344f
Side spans:2 x 171f
Deck width:40f
Notes
  • BPL cites this bridge as the first suspension bridge with metal towers. However, at least two earlier suspension bridges (1857 Watertown, New York and 1856 Bidwell Bar, California) are known to have metal towers and even Roebling's 1846 Smithfield Street Bridge in Pittsburgh had cast iron towers.
  • Next to 1884 North Side (Seventh Street) - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1867 John A. Roebling (Cincinnati, Cincinnati and Covington)
Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky, USA (Ohio River)
Bridgemeister ID:65
Structurae ID:0000513
O'Donnell ID:1000
Coordinates:N 39.09167 W 84.50833
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:BAAW, BC3, BOB, BPL, COB, EOV, HBE, LAB, LACE, ONF, PTS2, SJR, TOB
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular (two-lane heavy, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2013)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1,057f
Side spans:2
Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Wayne Grodkiewicz Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photo by David Denenberg Photo by David Denenberg
1883 Brooklyn (Great East River)
New York and Brooklyn, New York, USA (East River)
Bridgemeister ID:89
Structurae ID:0000011
O'Donnell ID:834
Coordinates:N 40.706 W 73.99667
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BAAW, BBR, BBTS, BC3, BFL, BLD, BMA, BOB, BOU, BPL, COB, CTW, GB, GBD, HBE, LAB, LACE, NG198305, ONF, PTS2, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling, Washington A. Roebling
Use:Rail and Vehicular (major highway, light rail, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2005)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1,595.5f
Side spans:2 x 930f
Deck width:85f

Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Josh Denenberg Photo by Bill Campbell
(chain bridge)
Durham, England, United Kingdom
Bridgemeister ID:510
References:BOB
Principals:Sir Samuel Brown
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Notes
  • This may be the same as the 1831 Whorlton bridge.
(footbridge)
Burnt Ranch vicinity, California, USA (Trinity River - Six Rivers National Forest)
Bridgemeister ID:2408
Use:Footbridge
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • Completed 1915-1917, likely removed, 1970s.
  • An article in the October 29, 1971 edition of The Times-Standard (Eureka, California) describes this bridge as being located over the Trinity River at New River. USGS topographical maps show a footbridge a few hundred yards north of the intersection of the two rivers at Gray Falls. The article has a photograph of the bridge and describes its possible replacement. The bridge was already closed at the time of the article: "A 50 year-old picturesque footbridge across the Trinity River at New River will be replaced if special funds can be obtained by the Six Rivers Nalional Forest, the federal agency has decided. 'Strong supportive response from people throughout the area to the continued need for a bridge' was reported by Forest Supervisor Bob Allison. The responses came after the Forest Service solicited comments in August on the replacement need for the span. The new bridge would be nearly as possible a replica of the present bridge constructed sometime between 1915 - 1917 by Jim and John Larson. It served as the main link between Denny and the outside world."
(footbridge)
Wood vicinity, Virginia, USA (Clinch River)
Bridgemeister ID:1371
O'Donnell ID:266
Coordinates:N 36.78314 W 82.56162
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
Principals:VDOT
Use:Footbridge
Status:In use (last checked, 2007)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:~225f
Side spans:~38f, ~46f
Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photo by Bob Taylor
Clarendon Gorge (Robert Brugmann Memorial)
Rutland vicinity, Vermont, USA (Mill River - Appalachian Trail)
Bridgemeister ID:323
O'Donnell ID:778
References:PQU
Use:Footbridge
Status:In use (last checked, 2013)
Main cables:Wire
Notes
  • Destroyed by flood 1973, rebuilt.
  • Welles Lobb writes: "Bob Brugmann, my best friend from high school, was attempting to cross an older damaged version of the bridge on July 4, 1973 during a flood when he was swept to death in the raging waters. Bob was 17, a brilliant budding environmentalist, and was attempting a southbound thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail the time of his accident. Later, the Green Mountain Club (a hiking organization) rebuilt the bridge and dedicated it to my late friend."
Photo by Sanford Bragg



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