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18 suspension bridges were found for search criteria: SIX . All 18 bridges from the search results appear below. Wherever you see a "Bridgemeister ID" number you can click it to isolate the bridge on its own page. If you don't see what you were looking for, try an image search with the same criteria: SIX. This will find the bridge if it is pictured on the site, but is not a catenary suspension bridge.
1810 Chain (Essex-Merrimack)
Newburyport, Massachusetts, USA (Merrimack River - Deer Island)
Bridgemeister ID:14
Structurae ID:0001418
Coordinates:N 42.833167 W 70.90645
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BBR, CAB, GBD, HBE, POPE, PTS2, RDH
Principals:John Templeman
Use:Vehicular (two-lane light)
Status:Replaced
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:243f
Deck width:30f (2 roadways of 15f)
Notes
  • John Templeman built several bridges (like this one) using James Finley's design.
  • Repaired in 1827 after 5 of 10 chains snapped under weight of a team of oxen.
  • The complete description from Thomas Pope's 1811 Treatise (POPE):
    "The chain Bridge lately thrown over the Merrimack, three miles above Newburyport, in the state of Massachusetts, is now in constant use. This Bridge consists of a single arc, two hundred and forty-four feet span. The abutments are of stone, forty-seven feet long, and thirty-seven high; the uprights, or framed work, which stand on the abutments, are thirty-five feet high, over which are suspended ten distinct chains, the ends of which on both sides of the river are buried deep in pits and secured by large stones: each chain is five hundred and sixteen feet long; and, where they pass over the uprights, they are treble, and made in short links, which is said to be more secure than saddles made of plates of iron. The four middle joists rest on the chains; all the rest are suspended to the main chains to equalize the floor. This Bridge has two passage-ways of fifteen feet in width each, and the floor is so solid as to admit of horses, carriages, etc. to travel at any speed, with very little perceptible motion of the floors. The railing is stout and strong, which adds much firmness to the floor. There are three chains in each range on each side, and four in the middle range: they are calculated to support nearly five hundred tons. From the surface of the water to the middle of the floor is forty feet; and from the top of the abutments to the top of the uprights is thirty-five feet high, making seventy-two feet. The magnitude and power of the abutments, the width and length of the floors, the elevation of the work, the evident powers of the chains, etc. all conspire to make it a wonderful work. Every expense attending it did not amount to twenty-five thousand dollars. The abutment being of stone, the uprights covered, and the chains painted to prevent rust, leaves nothing but the flooring to decay. This Bridge was constructed by John Templeman, Esq. of the district of Columbia, whose talents for the productions of such work, and the various improvements suggested and used by him, have been highly beneficial, and do him great credit."
  • Gregory W. Buff sent a transcription of an article describing the 1827 failure. The article was in the Saturday, February 24, 1827 issue (Volume IV, Number 31) of the Canadian Spectator (Montreal, Quebec) newspaper:
    "Newburyport, Feb 9. Disastrious [sic] Accident. - On Tuesday morning last, the Essex Merrimack Bridge gave way in the centre, from the parting of the chains that support it. On the Bridge, at the moment, was a loaded team, drawn by six oxen and two horses, driven by two men, Messrs. Garlton [sic] and Jackman, all of whom were precipitated, forty feet, into the river beneath. The teamsters preserved themselves by means of swimming, and the support of fragments of the bridge; the team were all of them except one of the horses, swept beneath the ice a few rods below, and drowned. Five of the ten chains which supported the Bridge, were snapped in different places, and now remain upholding the broken and shattered timber altogether as sad a wreck as we ever witnessed. At the moment of the crash, the light evolved from the friction of the chains resembled the the vivid streaming of a meteor. Various excuses are assigned for the accident, and none, with more probability, than the united effect of the incumbent pressure of the immense body of snow lying upon the bridge, and the frost which had contracted the particles of iron. These produced a tenseness in the chains, which was incapable of resisting the additional pressure of the loaded team, and the whole gave way. The estimated expense of repairing the breach is about 4000 dollars; and the Directors, as we understand, plan to set about it immediately. It will be built up as before. To those who have been losers by this accident the corporation intend to make generous inumeration. The traveling will be uninterrupted, as the solidity of the ice above the bridge forms a safe passage way - and for the conveyance of carriages and heavy baggage the proprietors have promptly provided suitable boats. If any aversion to chain bridges has been produced by this accident, we should be sorry, for ourselves we feel yet unshaken faith in their superior security. The misfortune in this case was no doubt owing to the causes above stated, and not to any defect in the construction of the bridge. Probably hundreds of individuals, including each sex and all ages, have visited the ruins of the bridge. They present a sad and melancholy appearance - crushed and broken timbers suspended by the massy chains, which hang lazily from the pyramidical abutments, while the beholder instinctly shrinks back in terror at the reflection of the situation of the two human beings who were precipitated into the abyss beneath. The preservation of these two men is almost miraculous. Although hurled down 40 feet amid crashing and falling timber, entangled with their cattle, they fell without receiving the least injury, and attained the shore, after being for nearly half an hour, immerse in water chilled to the freezing point. Mr. Jackman is far advanced in years - and suffered somewhat from the exposure to the cold. Mr. Carlton [sic], escaped unhurt. The Chain Bridge has been built for about fifteen years, the span is 220 feet. We believe this was the second or third Chain Bridge built in the United States; and this is probably the first that has met with a similar accident. We understand the proprieters of the Rooks Bridge intend to rebuild theirs as a Chain Bridge."
  • Replaced by 1909 Chain - Newburyport, Massachusetts, USA. The 1909 structure was almost entirely new (except for portions of the piers and abutments).
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg Glass slide, collection of David Denenberg
1835 Chasse (Givors)
Chasse-sur-Rhône and Givors, France (Rhône River)
Bridgemeister ID:980
Structurae ID:0013232
Coordinates:N 45.581666 E 4.780083
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:In use (last checked, 2005)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1
Side spans:2
Notes
  • Cables and deck appear to have been replaced (at least once).
  • AAJ describes an accident in 1836: "...some of the iron-work, which was faulty, gave way and the platform fell into the river. Six persons were drowned."
Photo by David Denenberg
1846 Saint Clair (Louis Philippe, Vaïsse)
Lyon, France (Rhône River)
Bridgemeister ID:551
Structurae ID:0022553
References:AAJ, PQL
Use:Vehicular
Status:Demolished, 1953
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Deck width:7m
Notes
  • Damaged by drifting boat, 1854. Rebuilt, 1856. Bombed, 1944. Rebuilt, 1946. Demolished, 1953.
  • Crossed at present-day location of Pont Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny.
  • Originally constructed with two suspended spans. When it was rebuilt in 1856, towers were added increasing the number of suspended spans to six.
  • Near 1845 College - Lyon, France.
Photograph, collection of David Denenberg
1852 Wilson's
Cosumne, California, USA (Cosumnes River)
Bridgemeister ID:2116
Coordinates:N 38.49229 W 121.17183
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:DSL200106
Principals:W. D. Wilson
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Main span:150f
Deck width:12f
Notes
  • The location of this bridge was near the present day location of Cosumne in Sacramento County, just east of Sloughhouse. The location coordinates provided here are only to show the approximate location of present-day Cosumne and should not be considered the exact location of the bridge. Don Sayenga writes: "The exact location was at the intersection of [present-day] Dillard Road and State Route 16 a very short distance east of Sloughhouse, Sacramento County, California... The whole area at that time was known as Daylor's Ranch."
  • Don Sayenga notes an F.W. Panhorst (of the California Highway Department) citation:
    "Alta California July 27, 1852 reprinting an article from Sacramento Union mentions a wire suspension bridge built in Sacramento County across the Cosumnes. The span is described as 150 feet with a roadway width of 12 feet. One W.D. Wilson is mentioned as owner and designer. This structure, according to our best information, was the first suspension bridge in California."
  • A January 14, 1862 Sacramento Bee article notes:
    "The quartz mill and house of the brothers Wiley, just beyond Butte City, were carried away by the torrent. At Ione City, Williamís brick stable had fallen, and several other houses had met with a like fate. On Sutter creek, the loss and damage had been terrific - bridges and houses being carried off like chaff. Mr. Haywood, proprietor of a quartz mill on Sutter creek, had been a loser to the amount of at least $75,000. We have it from good authority that in the counties of Calaveras and Amador not a bridge is left standing. Below Ione City, it is thought that there has been loss of life."

    "Last Saturday night, the reports of minute guns were heard, as if signals of distress, coming from the direction of a house where lived Mr. Martin and his family. The whole of Ione Valley was many feet under water. No boats were to be had, so that assistance might be rendered those in danger and distress. In a short time a heavy crash was heard, the signals of distress ceased, and our informant tells us that when he left the general impression was that Martin and his family had lost their lives. The wire suspension bridge over the Cosumnes river had disappeared - the house known as Wilsonís Exchange has also been washed away, and Daylorís adobe house is flat with the ground. These facts go to show that throughout the mountain districts, as well as in the valleys, the destruction of property and loss of human life exceed the worst that was anticipated, and we shall hear repetitions of such tales of distress as the avenues for communication are gradually opened to us."
    which seems to imply a relationship between the Ione Valley, the Cosumnes River, and the bridge at Wilson's Exchange, but this may have just been coincidental that both "Ione Valley" and Wilson's Exchange were mentioned in the same paragraph; they are nearby. Present-day Ione is in Amador County a few miles east of Sacramento County. The Cosumnes River forms the northern border of Amador County several miles to the north of present-day Ione. Barry Parr notes that the Cosumnes River does not flow through the "Ione Valley," but Barry writes: "Recalling Daylorís name in Historic Spots of California: 'Daylor established himself as a trader and hotel-keeper on the Cosumnes River about a mile east of Slough House. This place, which was at first known as Daylorís Ranch, later became the Cosumnes post office.' (p. 290) The site of Cosumnes post office is about five miles downstream from Bridge House, and both are on the Sacramento-Ione Road.
  • An Illustrated History of Sacramento County, California. (by Hon. Win. J. Davis, Lewis Publishing Company, 1890, Pages 435-436) sheds more light on W.D. Wilson. See Debbie Walke Gramlick's transcription:
    "Mr. Wilson and part of the company concluded to seek the land of gold, while others kept to the original design of going to Oregon. On his arrival Mr. Wilson mined for a short time on Mormon Island and then moved to Hangtown, now Placerville, where in the winter of 1848-49 he built the first house erected in that place. The family then comprised six children; five more were born in California; nine grew to maturity and seven are living in 1889. In the spring of 1850 he moved down on the Cosumnes and purchased 6,000 acres of the Hartnell Grant, and built a tavern, long known as Wilsonís Exchange, across the river from what is now the Cosumnes post office. He was postmaster from the establishment of that office until 1868. He was by trade a millwright and built the first suspension bridge on the Cosumnes."
  • See 1852 Huse - Yeomet, California, USA.
  • See Lamb's - Latrobe vicinity and Plymouth vicinity, California, USA.
1871 Ferry Street
Binghamton, New York, USA (Chenango River)
Bridgemeister ID:276
Principals:John A. Roebling's Sons, Co.
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed, 1897
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Main span:360f
Notes
  • This bridge was close to the alignment of Binghamton's present Clinton Street bridge. It replaced a bridge that was destroyed by flood in 1865. It was condemned in 1896 and removed in 1897. History Of Broome County indicates an act was passed March 13th, 1871 authorizing the bridge with the contract let to "W.A. Roebling & Son" each cable consisting of seven steel wire ropes, each two inches in diameter.
  • An article from the Binghamton Democrat, July 20, 1871: "The Suspension Bridge -- The work on the west abutment of the suspension bridge has been commenced and will be rapidly as advisable pushed forward to completion, and soon thereafter the wire cables will be placed in position, the stays, supports and girders made fast, and ready for the flooring. In the course of six or eight weeks it is hoped that the bridge will be completed, and our people given another way of passing from the 1st to the 2nd wards, and the old-pleasant driveway re-opened, of which we have been debarred since the flood of St-Patrick's Day in the morning in [1865]. Upon the completion of this enterprise, surely no one will ever regret having voted in favor of the free suspension bridge."
  • An article from the Binghamton Democrat, Nov. 30, 1871: "The New Bridge -- Its Cost -- For the suspenssion [sic] bridge, the tax-payers voted $28,000. It is finished, and in the Common Council last evening it was asserted that it cost over $30,000 and still all the claims are not satisfied. Mr. Jas. Fanning, contractor for building abutments, seeks relief for $1,000 or upwards which he is out no account of his contract. His petition was after considerable skirmishing finally referred to a committee. We hold that this is wrong, the Common Council has nothing to do with this matter. Mayor Dwight published a card binding himself to pay all over $28,000 that the bridge would cost. The people voted that amount and their representatives have nothing to do with any further cost or expense arrising [sic] from that source."
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1877 Cottaneva
Cottaneva Creek, Rockport, California, USA (Rockport Bay, Pacific Ocean)
Bridgemeister ID:1152
References:AAJ
Principals:Pacific Bridge Co.
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:270f
Notes
  • This bridge was part of the Rockport lumber mill (Mendocino County). The bridge stretched over ocean to a large rock in the bay.
  • Jakkula cites two sources describing the cables as steel.
  • Don Sayenga transcribed one of Jakkula's references, The Iron Age Volume XX , No. 3 (August 2, 1877) Page 1: "A Steel Wire Suspension Bridge In California"
    The Pacific Bridge Company are building in Mendocino county, California at Cottoneva, a suspension bridge which is described as follows "The distance from center to center of the saddles on the towers is 270 feet. The deflection or fall of the cable is 23 feet 6 inches. The cables are built in the same manner as those of the Clifton bridge at Niagara. The steel wire is about No. 11 Birmingham gauge, and is protected against rust by immersing in a bath which it a fine coat of zinc. There are eleven wires in each strand, seven strands in each rope, and seven ropes in each cable. The ropes are not twisted together to form the cable but gathered up every six feet by the suspender bands. Each rope is warranted to bear a strain of 60 tons. It is made fast to an independent anchor bar, 1 by 3 inches in diameter, and forming links 18 feet long, until connection is made with the anchors. The anchors are of cast iron, 3-1/2 by 3 feet in surface, weigh 1000 pounds each, and are placed 14 feet below the surface of the rock. Great care was taken in securing the anchors in place by means of cross I beams which run under the rock on either side. The lower part of each pit was enlarged to so as to form a hemispherical chamber, and the rock work, set in Portland cement, which is built upon the anchor, is so constructed that the upward strain is transmitted to the sides. The towers are of red wood. There are four posts 10 x 10 inches and two 10 x 12 inches, giving an effective area of 640 inches to withstand the strain of the cables on the tower. The wooden truss to prevent vertical vibration is 8 feet high and of the Howe truss pattern. The 270 feet of the bridge is divided into 45 pannels. The longest suspenders, 44 in number are of 7/8 inch steel wire, the 42 shorter ones are of 1-1/8 inch solid iron. The estimated dead load of the bridge is 1000 pounds per linear foot; live load, one ton per linear foot; in all, one and one half tons, or one fifth of actual breaking load. The bridge will be completed in about 30 days and promises to be a structure which the builders may well be proud of."
    Don writes: "[In] Jakkula's last citation, he is saying that this is factory-made wire rope... The construction of the wire rope (7 by 11) used in the main cables is not common for the USA as of 1877; in fact it is extremely uncommon. The wire ropes used at Clifton/Niagara were made in England -- it wouldn't surprise me if these were made in England too."
1882 Long Creek
Melvern vicinity, Kansas, USA (Long Creek - Francis Crossing)
Bridgemeister ID:2062
Principals:Wilden Bridge Company
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed, c. 1970
Notes
  • In the June 18, 1970 edition of the Daily Tribune newspaper (Great Bend, Kansas) an article titled "Last Suspension Bridge to Fall" describes this bridge: "The suspension bridge appears to be going the way of the old covered bridge in Kansas. At least, the particular type of suspension span represented by Osage County Bridge No. 18 may be gone when this structure is replaced within two years. L.D. Pierce, Osage County engineer, said he believes this 'homemade' suspension bridge probably is the last of its kind in this state. He said it was built in 1882 from a pencil-drawn plan that probably was prepared by asurveyor or a millwright. He said it was constructed with materials that could be found in any hardware store and lumber yard. For example, cables are No. 9 gauge wire, bound together. Pierce said at one time there were five or six of these bridges in Osage County. The 100-foot span over Long Creek has been closed to traffic since 1967."
  • See Long Creek - Melvern, Kansas, USA.
1931 George Washington (GWB)
New York, New York and Fort Lee, New Jersey, USA (Hudson River)
Bridgemeister ID:169
Structurae ID:0000032
O'Donnell ID:589
Coordinates:N 40.85333 W 73.955
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, AOB, ARF, BBR, BC3, BFL, BMA, BONJ, BOU, BPL, BRU, COB, CTW, ENR19270811a, ENR19270811b, ENR19290411c, GBD, LAB, LACE, PTS2, SIX, SJR
Principals:O.H. Ammann, Leon Moisseiff, Dana, Gilbert
Use:Vehicular (double-deck, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2007)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:3,500f
Side spans:2 x 650f
Deck width:120f

Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Wayne Grodkiewicz Photo by John Hall Photograph, collection of David Denenberg Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell
1936 Triborough
New York and Queens, New York, USA (East River - Randalls-Wards Island)
Bridgemeister ID:186
Structurae ID:0000533
O'Donnell ID:837
Coordinates:N 40.781283 W 73.9273
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, GBD, SIX
Principals:O.H. Ammann, Allston Dana
Use:Vehicular (major highway, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2008)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1,380f
Side spans:2 x 704.75f
Deck width:96f
Photo by David Denenberg
1939 Bronx-Whitestone
The Bronx and Queens, New York, USA (East River)
Bridgemeister ID:191
Structurae ID:0000010
O'Donnell ID:839
Coordinates:N 40.80167 W 73.83
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, ARF, BAAW, BBR, BFL, BPL, GBD, SIX
Principals:O. H. Ammann, Allston Dana
Use:Vehicular (major highway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2004)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:2,300f
Side spans:2 x 735f

Notes
Photo by David Denenberg
1957 (footbridge)
Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, USA (Colorado River)
Bridgemeister ID:1191
Principals:Kiewit-Judson Pacific Murphy Co.
Use:Footbridge
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:1,280f
Notes
  • Very long, very high footbridge spanning the canyon. Originally built for bridge workers building the Glen Canyon Bridge (the large deck arch next to the dam). Survived at least until 1959.
  • From a Roebling ad in the July 1958 issue of Civil Engineering: "The bridge was completed in sixty days and features a steel mesh deck, to reduce wind resistance. Construction was started by lowering two 5/8 in. cables to the bottom of the west side of the gorge, transporting them across the river by boat and raising them on the east side by block and tackle. The six main suspension cables are 1 3/4 in. diameter prestretched galvanized bridge strands. From them are hung sixty-four 5/8 in. suspenders, attached to 7 ft-wide floor beams. The wire mesh floor is laid on eight 1 in. diameter deck cables. These in turn are supported every twenty feet by the floor beams. For safety, four handrail cables are attached to the suspenders. To add stability in strong winds, two 1 3/4 in. bridge strand wind brace cables run below the deck on either side for its length."
1961 Throgs Neck
The Bronx and Queens, New York, USA (East River)
Bridgemeister ID:215
Structurae ID:0000534
O'Donnell ID:838
Coordinates:N 40.8 W 73.795
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:ARF, BCO, SIX, VNB
Principals:O. H. Ammann
Use:Vehicular (major highway)
Status:In use
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1,800f
Side spans:2

Notes
Photo courtesy Ronald and Elizabeth Denenberg
1964 Verrazano Narrows
Brooklyn and Staten Island, New York, USA (Verrazano Narrows)
Bridgemeister ID:219
Structurae ID:0000085
O'Donnell ID:833 (more: 833)
Coordinates:N 40.60667 W 74.045
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:BBR, BC3, BFL, BOU, COB, CTW, GBD, LAB, SIX, VNB
Principals:Othmar H. Ammann, Whitney
Use:Vehicular (double-deck)
Status:In use
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:4,260f

Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell
2005 Dhodhara-Chandani
Dhodhara and Chandani, Kanchanpur District, Nepal (Mahakali River)
Bridgemeister ID:2044
Use:Footbridge
Status:In use (last checked, 2006)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Notes
  • Huge footbridge, total length is 1,452 meters. With eight towers, it appears to be four back-to-back bridges with three common anchorages giving four catenary main spans and eight side spans (or six side spans; I'm unsure if there are side spans at the extreme ends).
(footbridge)
Burnt Ranch vicinity, California, USA (Trinity River - Six Rivers National Forest)
Bridgemeister ID:2408
Use:Footbridge
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • Completed 1915-1917, likely removed, 1970s.
  • An article in the October 29, 1971 edition of The Times-Standard (Eureka, California) describes this bridge as being located over the Trinity River at New River. USGS topographical maps show a footbridge a few hundred yards north of the intersection of the two rivers at Gray Falls. The article has a photograph of the bridge and describes its possible replacement. The bridge was already closed at the time of the article: "A 50 year-old picturesque footbridge across the Trinity River at New River will be replaced if special funds can be obtained by the Six Rivers Nalional Forest, the federal agency has decided. 'Strong supportive response from people throughout the area to the continued need for a bridge' was reported by Forest Supervisor Bob Allison. The responses came after the Forest Service solicited comments in August on the replacement need for the span. The new bridge would be nearly as possible a replica of the present bridge constructed sometime between 1915 - 1917 by Jim and John Larson. It served as the main link between Denny and the outside world."
Brown's Ford
Brown's Ford and Lowry City vicinity, Missouri, USA (Osage River)
Bridgemeister ID:2325
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Notes
  • The June 22, 1940 edition of The Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune (Chillicothe, Missouri) has an article titled "Three Killed in Bridge Collapse, Workmen were repairing the structure near Lowry City, Mo." describing a fatal collapse of the bridge: "Three men were killed, three injured critically and an 8-year old boy believed drowned when cribbing on a wooden suspension bridge across the Osage River six miles east of Lowry City collapsed about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The bridge, on a farm-to-market road in St. Clair County, was being remodeled. Of the ten men working and bystanders on and near the structure when it fell, only one escaped without injury. All those killed or injured lived in St. Clair County. On the west side of the bridge a framework of heavy timbers had been inserted between one of the suspension cables and an old wooden pier, which originally had supported the cable. The workmen were attempting to slide a steel pier under the cable, to replace the wooden pier. The cribbing suddenly gave way, and the pressure from the cable hurled the wood supports in all directions. The bridge floor dropped into the river, except for a small section near the east end."
Skywalk
Monteverde, Costa Rica (Monteverde Cloud Forest)
Bridgemeister ID:1118
Use:Footbridge
Status:In use
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Notes
  • At least six separate spans at this site, all very tall, very narrow, long footbridges. At least two (and probably more) meet my requirements for inclusion in the inventory.
South Fork Mule
Hyampom vicinity, California, USA (South Fork Trinity River - Six Rivers National Forest)
Bridgemeister ID:1993
O'Donnell ID:429
Coordinates:N 40.719083 W 123.523217
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
Use:Footbridge
Status:Closed (last checked, 2006)
Main cables:Wire (steel)
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • Marilyn Renaker of the "Committee to Save the Mule Bridge" writes in late August, 2006: "Trinity County and the Forest Service would like to abandon the Mule Bridge. Hyampom had a town meeting about this and everyone was opposed to the removal of the bridge which has been a part of our community since 1913."
Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photo courtesy of Jennifer Lance



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